chinstrap penguin, chinstrap penguin facts, chinstrap penguin species

Scientific Classification

Common Name Chinstrap Penguin
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Sphenisciformes
Family Spheniscidae
Genus Species Pygoscelis

Scientific Name

The Chinstrap penguin is perhaps one of the most abundant penguins in the Antarctica region, which inhabits various islands and beaches in the Southern Pacific and the Antarctic Oceans. Pygoscelis antarcticus is the scientific name, and Spheniscidae is the family name and belongs to the class Aves.

This species became the same genus as the King Penguins and the Emperor Penguins because it was given the scientific name Aptenodytes Antarctica by Johann Reinhold Forster in 1781. Graham Turbott transferred this penguin species to the genus Pygoscelis in 1990, together with the Gentoo penguins and Adélie penguins.

Breeding

Chinstrap penguins usually lay two eggs but are usually 2 to 4 weeks behind other Pygoscelis species in the same area. They lay their eggs at the end of November and hatch in early January. The chicks have generally fledged after two months. The Chinstraps complete their breeding cycle in February or March and return to the pack ice during the winter seasons. The chicks hatch in about 7 to 8 weeks.

Both males and females participate in the incubation period of 33 to 36 days, whereas they hatch the eggs in shifts of 5 to 10 days. After 33–35 days, the chicks hatch and remain in the nests for 20–30 days before joining their crèches. At the age of 50–60 days of molting, the chicks finally go out to sea.

In the CCAMLR (Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) subarea, which includes the adjacent islands and Antarctic Peninsula, 75.2% of breeding Chinstrap penguins were found in the South Shetland Islands and 23.0% were in the Elephant Island region; smaller numbers were in the Central-west, Northwest, and Southwest regions of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Distribution

Chinstrap penguins are an abundant penguin and a circumpolar distribution species in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions, which is found in Argentina, Bouvet Island, Chile, the Falkland Islands, the French Southern Territories, and the South Sandwich Islands. They have also been found in South Africa, New Zealand, the islands of Saint Helena, Tristan da Cunha, and South Georgia.

chinstrap penguin, chinstrap penguin facts, chinstrap penguin species
chinstrap penguin, chinstrap penguin facts, chinstrap penguin species
chinstrap penguin, chinstrap penguin facts, chinstrap penguin species

Chinstrap Penguin Facts And Information

Type Bird
Description Chinstrap penguins (Stone-cracker penguins) are one of the most abundant penguins in the Antarctic, where they congregate in large breeding colonies. They have a white face and thin, dark feathers under the chin
Distribution Restricted to the coasts of Ball-any Islands, south of New Zealand
Size 46–61 cm (18–24 in)
Weight 4 kg (9 lbs)
Color Black, Grey, White
Skin Type Feathers
Food Krill, Fish, Shrimp, and smaller amounts of fish
Diet Carnivore and primarily large krill
Incubation 30–35 days
Sexual Maturity 3–8 years old
Lifestyle Colony
Life Span 15–20 years
Range Circumpolar in subantarctic and Antarctic waters
Habitat Rocky Antarctic Islands
Predators Killer Whale, Leopard Seal, Sea Birds
Population More than 6.5 million breeding pairs
Population Trend Decreasing
  • The Chinstrap penguins are perhaps one of the most abundant penguins in the Antarctica region which is found in the South Sandwich Islands, Antarctica, Deception Island, the South Orkneys, South Shetland, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, and Ball-any.
  • Chinstrap penguins are also known as Bearded, Ringed, and Stone-cracker penguins, because of their loud noisy call.
  • Its common name (Chinstrap Penguin) comes from the thin black band on its chin, with a distinctive black strip under its head.
  • Chinstrap penguins are members of the Penguins Brushtail Group.
  • Spheniscidae is the family name, Pygoscelis antarcticus is the scientific name, and Aves belong to the class.
  • Chinstrap penguins are about 20 years old.
  • Chinstrap can swim as far as 80 km and reach speeds of 30 mph.
  • There are about 3.42 million breeding pairs.
  • Female penguins are slightly smaller than male penguins but otherwise look very similar.
  • The Chinstrap penguins are perhaps one of the most abundant penguins in the Antarctica and sub-Antarctic regions.
  • Chinstrap penguins are about the same size as Adélie penguins, with an average length of about 70 cm and an average weight of 4 kg.
  • These species of penguin are mid-sized, 46 to 61 cm in height, and 4 to 7 kg in weight.
  • The Chinstrap penguins are native to the coastal areas of Argentina, Bouvet Island, Chile, South Africa, New Zealand, the Falkland Islands, the French Southern Territories, and the South Sandwich Islands.
  • There are 52,786 breeding pairs on Elephant Island is 58% down from the last survey in 1971.
  • Male and female Chinstrap penguins are similar in size and features, which makes it difficult to tell the difference between them, male or female.
  • Both males and females participate in the incubation period of 33 to 36 days. Both parents hatch the eggs in shifts of 5 to 10 days.
  • The Chinstraps complete their breeding cycle in February or March and return to the pack ice during the winter seasons.
  • The chicks hatch in about 7 to 8 weeks.
  • They lay their eggs at the end of November and hatch in early January.
  • Chinstrap penguins can build their nests during their reproductive period.
  • They usually raise two chicks each summer.
  • Chinstrap penguins use covered nests that protect their eggs from intense sunlight, and aerial and terrestrial predators.
  • Chinstrap uses their wings to help them swim, and their webbed feet to steer underwater.
  • Chinstrap penguins mainly eat fish, especially anchovies, herring, and smelt. They also eat squid, crustaceans (shrimp and krill), and smaller amounts of fish.
  • Like other species of penguin, Chinstrap are excellent swimmers.
  • The chinstrap penguins are generally threatened by atmospheric conditions.
  • The chinstrap penguins belong to two other penguins, Gentoo and Adélie.

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